Ahimsa

Having a soft heart in a hard world

I've been thinking a lot lately on what it means to have a soft heart. To feel, acutely. 

Earth as self, animals as self, the homeless person on the corner, as self. 
And about how the world at large and even most therapists and others in helping professions, attribute this depth of feeling to some kind of pathology, to something missing from our childhood, or a projection of the hurt parts of ourselves onto those most vulnerable, and it is dismissed as a kind of "reverse healing" that negates our authentic impulse.

I strongly counter that rather than soft hearts indicating that something is wrong with us, they are an indication that something is RIGHT with us.

Feeling, viscerally, as part of the whole; recognizing the struggle of another, the experience of empathy, a call to alleviate suffering, seeing self in others -across the illusory divide of species and color and culture (and that there IS no "other") are all part of moving closer to our unfettered state and essential nature.

And, softness doesn't cancel out ferocity.

Walking this earth with a soft heart, the willingness to feel the pain (and the magnificence) of mad love for all that is, and the impulse to act upon it, is a gift. 

Do more of that.
Nothing is wrong with you.

Universal Motherhood and Love for all Beings

"Anyone who has the courage to overcome the limitations of the mind will attain the state of universal motherhood. This is a love and compassion felt not only towards one’s own child, but also towards all people, animals, plants, rocks and rivers. It is a love extended to all of nature and all beings. to one in whom the state of true motherhood has awakened, all creatures are her children. this awakening of love, this motherhood, is Divine Love. This is God." ~Amma

May all beings everywhere be happy and free, and may the thoughts, words, and actions of my own life contribute in some way to that happiness and to that freedom for all.

"This is a prayer each one of us can practice every day. It reminds us that our relationships with all beings and things should be mutually beneficial if we ourselves desire happiness and liberation from suffering. No true or lasting happiness can come from causing unhappiness to others. No true or lasting freedom can come from depriving others of their freedom. If we say we want every being to be happy and free, then we have to question everything that we do-how we live, how we eat, what we buy, how we speak, and even how we think." Sharon Gannon http://www.karunaforanimals.com